Mid-Century Modern Blockheads

Mid-Century Modern Blockheads

By Heather M. David – Are you a blockhead? From the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s, concrete block was mass-produced in the U.S. and very popular. It can be seen in many residences, office buildings, schools, churches, motels, and shopping centers from this period.
Lost Photos, Found Memories: Motels

Lost Photos, Found Memories: Motels

By Edward Engel – Images of roadside cabin courts and teepee-shaped motel rooms shot by honeymooners or vacationing families in the heyday of American tourist travel are among the thousands of “found photos” I own. I hope you enjoyed this sampling of images of motels and the folks that stay in them.
Exposing the “Motel Menace”

Exposing the “Motel Menace”

FULL ARTICLE by Lyell Henry – The tourist camps that had at first been hailed as delightful expressions of American character and genius now were as likely to be viewed as hotbeds of sordidness and immorality, even as “Camps of Crime,” said J. Edgar Hoover.
Clown Motel sign, Tonopah, Nevada

Tonopah, Nevada Clowns Around with the American Psyche

By Elsa Court – A Facebook mention about an article on Tonopah, Nevada and its Clown Motel in the Fall 2018 SCA Journal really hit a primal nerve, generating more engagement and attracting more shares than almost any previous post. Here's the article.
<span style="color: red">RECAP: </span>The Golden Age of Air Travel

RECAP: The Golden Age of Air Travel

Join SCA board member Tim O’Brien as he recaps the many, many highlights of our summer tour, “The Golden Age of Air Travel.” As you will see, an amazingly good time was had by all.
A Good Night’s Sleep

A Good Night’s Sleep

By Lyle Miller – The sign beckons you, the building interests you, and the office welcomes you, but the room itself defines most of your motel lodging experience ...
Valentine Diner catalog view, 1940s

Landrum’s – The Biggest Little Diner

FULL ARTICLE by Mella Rothwell Harmon – Landrum’s Diner in Reno, NV, is small, just 240 square feet, yet it plays an unusually large role in local history.
Route 66: Another Perspective on “Mother” Road

Route 66: Another Perspective on “Mother” Road

A new public history project, The Women on the Mother Road: Route 66, sheds light on women’s experiences along the historic highway.
Miss Alma Makes a Bee Line: A Story of One Woman and Two Auto Trails

Miss Alma Makes a Bee Line: A Story of One Woman and Two Auto Trails

By John and Kris Murphey – As the first female transcontinental highway booster, Alma Rittenberry had promoted her Jackson Highway not only as a memorial to the former President nicknamed “Old Hickory,” but as a progressive path to get farmers out of the mud and a source of “financial and cultural gain” for the North and South.