SCA Weekly News Review: September 1, 2019

SCA Weekly News Review: September 1, 2019

Montreal Gets a ‘Remarkable’ Chance to Build a New Neighborhood

The Molson brewery in Montreal, pictured in 2005. Shaun Best/Reuters

From CityLab: For 236 years, the name Molson has watched over Montreal’s Centre-Sud neighborhood, from the area’s earliest days as an agricultural plain to its evolution into a workers’ village, a manufacturing hub, a postwar ghetto, and eventually, a lively yet rough-around-the-edges gay village.

British settler John Molson established a log brewery on the banks of the St. Lawrence River in 1782. Then, in the final days of 1784, the 21-year-old officially established the Molson Brewery, selling his first beer a year later. Through expansion and rebuilding after Montreal’s Great Fire of 1852, the facility—the operational heart of what is now one of the world’s largest breweries, and a lonely relic of the neighborhood’s industrial past—still stands in its original location.

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ModTexas Aims to Save Midcentury Architecture One Hashtag at a Time

David Halloran

From DMagazine: Amy Walton walked away with one question after attending an event organized by the Okie Mod Squad, a group of midcentury modern architecture and design enthusiasts who documented Oklahoma City’s MCM gems: “Where the hell is something like this in Texas?”

Buildings of the period, defined by sleek lines and minimal ornamentation, are threatened by development and decay despite being relatively recent history.

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Photos: New Sunset Showcase Theatre Digital Marquee for Mickey’s PhilharMagic

From the Laughing Place: Mickey’s PhilharMagic in Disney California Adventure recently debuted a new marquee at its Hollywood Blvd. entrance. The brilliant Sunset Showcase Theatre marquee features a digital sign for the musical attraction complete with a moving title and a character surprise.

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CBS special at TWA Hotel

From solari linedesign: A TWA Hotel Special, aired by CBS, talks about the split-flap display manufactured by SOLARI DI UDINE SPA.

Morse wanted everything done right – from the signature clock in the center atrium, to the chili pepper red sunken lounge, to the iconic Solari departure boards, all restored to their original 1962 glory. “We wanted to be historically authentic here,” Morse said. Which meant going to Udine, Italy, two hours outside of Venice, where the original board was made 57 years ago. The flip signs (and their distinctive sound) have been a staple of train stations and airports worldwide. Then as now, the sign’s 34,000 flaps are created by hand.

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The Top 5 Photo Spots in Osaka, Japan

From Adorama Learning Center: While Tokyo and Kyoto are Japan’s most popular spots for photographers to visit, my personal favorite city to shoot in is actually Osaka.

The often overlooked city has a completely different vibe to Tokyo and is also known for its delicious food, with okonomiyaki (a Japanese omelette or pancake) being a clear favorite.

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