SCA Weekly News Review: June 16, 2019

SCA Weekly News Review: June 16, 2019

Alderman Plans To Save Gately’s Peoples Store Neon Sign

From WBBM NEWSRADIO: CHICAGO — Demolition is underway of the old Gately’s Peoples Store building in the Roseland neighborhood, but a very familiar piece of that building will live on.

9th Ward Ald. Anthony Beale said the neon Gately’s Peoples Store sign will be saved.

“We have a real golden opportunity to preserve some long-standing history in our community,” he said.

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Historic North Shore diner closes its doors — at least for now

From WCVB 5: SALEM, Mass. — A historic landmark on the North Shore has closed its doors.

The Salem Diner, on Loring Avenue across from the Salem State University campus, had been open for 78 years, since the early days of World WarII in 1941. It’s in a Sterling Streamliner car and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.

It’s one of only 10 Sterling Streamliner diners remaining in the country, and one of only two in New England — the other is in Providence, Rhode Island. They were designed to look like the sleek, modern train cars of the time.

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Developers want to restore historic theater but neighbors don’t want alcohol sales

From Denver 7: DENVER — Developers are trying to restore an old theater in the Berkeley neighborhood by bringing entertainment back to the once thriving space, but some neighbors don’t want alcohol to be sold there.

The old theater doesn’t look like much on the outside, but inside developers see it as a future gem of Denver’s music scene. They want to transform it into a music venue, bar and a space that can be used for weddings and comedy events.

“Urban Denver neighborhoods that provide a mix of entertainment options dining options, I think that’s what makes Denver great,” Yates Theater owner Ari Stutz said.

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Penny postcards preserve Washington of yesteryear

BEAUTIFUL HOMES: This postcard featuring some of Washington’s stately homes was mailed in 1948 and features an Ernul postmark. (Brown Library)

From the Washington Daily News: Measuring roughly three by five inches, the small piece of heavy paper packs a big wallop when it come to history.

A postcard depicting the Washington Hospital and dated 1903, the bit of ephemera captures the image of a landmark that has been lost to the ages. It’s among the oldest postcards in a small collection housed in the John A. Wilkinson History Room at the George H. and Laura E. Brown Library in Washington.

Such postcards were often discovered by local residents who, knowing their significance, wanted to preserve them for future generations of Beaufort County residents to appreciate and enjoy. Rather than toss them out with the trash, they insured that the postcards would be placed in the local archives.

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Unique roadside attractions, including geographical center of North America, are just a short drive away

The World’s Largest Buffalo brings visitors from all over to Jamestown, N.D., to catch a glimpse of this massive work of art. Dan Koeck / Special to The Forum

From the West Fargo Pioneer: FARGO — Summertime means family time. Children are off from school and adults want to get out and take advantage of the precious, beautiful weather.

Our area is known for a great many things — fertile soil, nice people and phenomenal views — but did you know the region is also home to some of the world’s largest roadside attractions?

Many of these attractions are within easy driving distance of Fargo-Moorhead, so pack some snacks, grab the kids and fill up the gas tank — honey, we are going on a road trip.

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