Dr. Patrick’s Postcard Roadside

Golden Star Diner

The mobile, prefabricated restaurant known as the diner originating in the mill towns of New England in the 1870s, but shifted to New Jersey in the early 20th century where manufacturers like O’Mahony, Fodero, Kullman, Paramount, Paterson Vehicle, Mountain View, and Swingle scattered diners to the roadside.

Dripping stainless steel Modernity, the Golden Star Diner was a mid-1950s O’Mahony that served the ceaseless stream of traffic thundering through Little Falls, New Jersey, on US 46, main road west from the George Washington Bridge. Following the path of successful diner operators, the owners traded up for a bigger, newer model in the late-1960s.

Club Flamingo

Club Flamingo

The dinner-dance club was a staple in every urban entertainment district in the country from the 1930s into the 1960s.

It was celebrated in dozens of Hollywood movies of the same vintage where the young couple crowded at little, candle-lit table to see a floor show, a singing act and then dance. The favorite nightclub décor was anything tropical-exotic, like Chicago’s colorful Club Flamingo on Madison Avenue just west of the Loop.

Crazy Water

Crazy Water

The gateway arch sign to Mineral Wells, Texas, advertises the home-ground CRAZY Water, the mineral-laden water that caused this small spot on the prairie west of Fort Worth to be the mineral springs spa of central Texas from the 1880s to the 1940s.

Back in 1881, the water purportedly made the local crazy woman somewhat less crazy. Ed Dismuke founded the Famous Mineral Water Company in 1904, bottling Crazy Water and manufacturing Crazy Crystals for people to stir into their own tap water to cure all sorts of maladies.